Czech Republic

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{{Country |name=Czech Republic |image_flag=Czech-Republic-Flag.jpg‎ |Region=Europe |Population=10381130 |GDP=175,309 |Eggs for assisted reproduction=commercial prohibited |Eggs for research=? |Inheritable genetic modification=PROHIBITED |Preimplantation genetic diagnosis=social uses prohibited |Reproductive cloning=PROHIBITED |Research cloning=PROHIBITED |Sex selection=? |Surrogacy=commercial prohibited |European Union=Member |Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development=Member |Council of Europe=Member |1997 COE Biomedicine Convention=RATIFIED |1998 COE Cloning Convention=RATIFIED |2005 UN Cloning Vote=no |2005 UNESCO Sports Doping Convention=RATIFIED |Treaty of Lisbon=signed |Key laws and policies=* Act on Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Related Activities and on Amendment to Some Related Acts, 227/2006 Coll. Part: 75/2006 Coll. (June 1, 2006)

  • Council of Europe Convention on Biomedicine and Human Rights and Additional Protocol on Cloning (1997, 1998)

|Prohibited practices=The Act on Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells prohibits

  • the creation of an embryo for purposes other than reproduction
  • human-animal hybrids
  • implanting a human embryo into an animal uterus
  • reproductive cloning

Ratification of the Council of Europe Convention on Biomedicine and Human Rights and Additional Protocol on Cloning commits the Czech Republic to prohibit

  • Inheritable genetic modification
  • Reproductive cloning
  • Research cloning
  • Sex selection for social purposes
  • PGD for social purposes
  • Somatic genetic enhancement

|Permitted and regulated practices=The Act on Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells

  • limits PGD to "exclude risks of serious genetically conditioned diseases and defects."
  • limits sex selection to "prevent serious Mendel-type sex-related genetically conditioned diseases that a) are incompatible with the postnatal development of a child, b) significantly shorten the life, c) cause early disablement or other serious health consequences, or d) are untreatable given our present level of knowledge."
  • permits providing eggs for reproductive purposes only without compensation.

There is no law addressing surrogacy.

References